Tuesday, November 28, 2017: “Monitoring Wildlife Corridors and Habitat Patches Around Canmore” with John Paczkowski

Join us for our second Fall 2017 program

7:30 pm
Banff Seniors Centre
Free admission
Everyone is Welcome!
John will present the preliminary results of the Human Use Management Review monitoring of wildlife corridor and habitat patches around Canmore. Between May 2015 and June 2017 , the Town of Canmore and Alberta Environment and Parks, Parks Division, embarked on a two-year collaborative study to better understand both wildlife and human use of the valley, particularly within wildlife corridors. The study stemmed from a series of recommendations developed through a comprehensive stakeholder process known as the Canmore Human Use Management Review (HUMR). The overall goal of our study is to determine how wildlife and humans use the greater Canmore/Bow Valley landscape so both provincial and municipal land managers can develop effective strategies to increase the sustainability of the area for wildlife.

As part of the HUMR monitoring program 77 remote wildlife cameras were deployed throughout the Bow Valley surrounding the town of Canmore. Cameras were distributed systematically at one camera per square kilometre and at higher densities in identified wildlife movement corridors. Approximately half of the cameras were set on wildlife trails and half were set on human-use trails in order to determine differences in use for the two trail types. Cameras were serviced monthly by Alberta Parks staff and volunteers. Camera data was analyzed using Timelapse software (Version 2.0). Over 2-million images were reviewed and classified during the course of the study which were classified into 291,000 data points of which Humans represented 93%. We recorded almost 50,000 records of dogs in the study area, 58% of which were off leash. Data on the distribution of these results will be presented. Preliminary analyses indicated that Off-leash dogs were negatively associated with habitat use of black bears, elk, mule deer and white-tailed deer, Hikers were negatively associated with habitat use of cougars and white-tailed deer. Other wildlife movement data from area will also be presented and discussed.

Key people involved in the study were: Melanie Percy, Sandra Code, Nicole Heim and Cheryl Hojnowski

John Paczkowski is a Park Ecologist with the Parks Division of Alberta Environment and Parks in the Kananaskis Region. John is a biologist who has concentrated his career on wildlife research and conservation, mainly with large carnivores. A resident of the Bow Valley, on and off since 1991, John has been involved in numerous projects involving research on carnivores in the region. John uses wildlife research as a lens to focus decisions on the protection and management of Alberta parks and adjacent lands. He welcomes collaboration with other scientists, students and the public.

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